Difference between revisions of "Portland Metropolitan Area"

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[[File:Portland metro area crop.png|thumb|The Portland metropolitan area spans Washington and Oregon.]]
 
[[File:Portland metro area crop.png|thumb|The Portland metropolitan area spans Washington and Oregon.]]
The '''Portland metropolitan area''', also known as the Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro Metropolitan Statistical Area, the OR-WA Metropolitan Statistical Area, and Greater Portland, is defined by the US Census Bureau as [[Clackamas County]], [[Columbia County]], [[Multnomah County]], [[Washington County]], and [[Yamhill County]] in Oregon, and [[Clark County]] and [[Skamania County]] in [[Washington]]. Cities in the Portland metro area include [[Portland]], [[Beaverton]], [[Gresham]], [[Hillsboro]], and [[Vancouver]]. The area also includes the smaller cities of [[Damascus]], [[Fairview]], [[Forest Grove]], [[Gladstone]], [[King City]], [[Lake Oswego]], [[Milwaukie]], [[Oregon City]], [[Sherwood]], [[Tigard]], [[Troutdale]], [[Tualatin]], [[West Linn]], [[Wilsonville]], and [[Wood Village]] in Oregon, and [[Battle Ground]], [[Camas]], and [[Washougal]] in Washington.
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The '''Portland metropolitan area''', also known as '''Greater Portland''', the '''Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro Metropolitan Statistical Area''', and the '''OR-WA Metropolitan Statistical Area''', is defined by the US Census Bureau as [[Clackamas County]], [[Columbia County]], [[Multnomah County]], [[Washington County]], and [[Yamhill County]] in Oregon, and [[Clark County]] and [[Skamania County]] in [[Washington]]. Cities in the Portland metro area include [[Portland]], [[Beaverton]], [[Gresham]], [[Hillsboro]], and [[Vancouver]]. The area also includes the smaller cities of [[Damascus]], [[Fairview]], [[Forest Grove]], [[Gladstone]], [[King City]], [[Lake Oswego]], [[Milwaukie]], [[Oregon City]], [[Sherwood]], [[Tigard]], [[Troutdale]], [[Tualatin]], [[West Linn]], [[Wilsonville]], and [[Wood Village]] in Oregon, and [[Battle Ground]], [[Camas]], and [[Washougal]] in Washington.
  
The population of the Portland metro area was estimated at 2,241,841 in 2009, up from 1,927,881 in 2000.<ref name="Census2009">[http://www.census.gov/popest/metro/CBSA-est2009-annual.html Annual Estimates of the Population: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2009], US Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011.03.15.</ref>
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The population of the Portland metro area was estimated at 2,265,091 in 2011<ref>[http://www.bizjournals.com/buffalo/datacenter/metro-area-populations-july-1-2011.html Metro area populations (as of July 1, 2011)], ''Business First''</ref>, up from 2,241,841 in 2009 and 1,927,881 in 2000.<ref name="Census2009">[http://www.census.gov/popest/metro/CBSA-est2009-annual.html Annual Estimates of the Population: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2009], US Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011.03.15.</ref>
  
 
== References ==
 
== References ==

Latest revision as of 16:27, 23 May 2013

The Portland metropolitan area spans Washington and Oregon.

The Portland metropolitan area, also known as Greater Portland, the Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro Metropolitan Statistical Area, and the OR-WA Metropolitan Statistical Area, is defined by the US Census Bureau as Clackamas County, Columbia County, Multnomah County, Washington County, and Yamhill County in Oregon, and Clark County and Skamania County in Washington. Cities in the Portland metro area include Portland, Beaverton, Gresham, Hillsboro, and Vancouver. The area also includes the smaller cities of Damascus, Fairview, Forest Grove, Gladstone, King City, Lake Oswego, Milwaukie, Oregon City, Sherwood, Tigard, Troutdale, Tualatin, West Linn, Wilsonville, and Wood Village in Oregon, and Battle Ground, Camas, and Washougal in Washington.

The population of the Portland metro area was estimated at 2,265,091 in 2011[1], up from 2,241,841 in 2009 and 1,927,881 in 2000.[2]

References

  1. Metro area populations (as of July 1, 2011), Business First
  2. Annual Estimates of the Population: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2009, US Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011.03.15.
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